Seven Things You Didn’t Know about the Rottweiler Lab Mix

This is one adorable breed of dog that has some of the best qualities in a pet, that it is commonly found in homes all over the country. It is one of the most common hybrid dogs and is full of fun and energy, just like its Lab heritage, yet has a lot of stamina, just like the Rottweiler. The puppies of this breed, are beautiful, fun, loving and plain adorable. You will have fun with this breed and enjoy it as a family pet, so long as you create the type of home for your Rottweiler Lab mix. Every dog has its specific characteristics, features and needs in care. If you’re interested in this breed, keep reading to see what seven things you didn’t know about the Rottweiler Lab mix, and see if he would make a good pet for you.

1. Not a registered breed

Not all breeds of dogs are recognized as a true breed with the major breed associations, such as the American Kennel Club (AKC), and the Rottweiler Lab is one. This is because this is a cross between two separate breeds to make another. One registry that does recognize it, is the American Canine Hybrid Club, and many people who breed these dogs, feel strongly that they should be recognized as their own breed.

2. They go by several different names

Many hybrid dogs have multiple names they are recognized by. While a Poodle is typically just called a “Poodle,” a mixed breed adopts multiple names and the Rottweiler Lab is no different. If you were to hear the names, Larottie, Rottwador, Rott’n Lab, or a Rottador, they would all be referring to this breed. Different breeders use different names, but they are all the same two breeds of dogs, the Labroador and the Rottweiler, mated, to create this offspring.

3. The costs related to a Labrottie

All dogs will cost their owner money; it’s just part of being a dog owner. For a Labrottie, the costs start at the purchase of your puppy. The average cost of a Labrottie pup is $300-$600. From there, you can expect to spend approximately $485 and $585 a year on their medical care. Other non-medical expenses, on average, will cost about $515-$615 per year. Other than that, expenses will vary depending on the type of spoiling you want to do for your furry family member.

4. Health issues

Like people, dogs are prone to health issues, and Labrotties do have some health concerns. Although Labrotties are said to be generally more healthy than a full bred dog due to their mixed lineage, the most common types of health issues they can face include, hypothyroidism, epilepsy, myopathy, bone cancer, bloat, OCD, eye problems, along with, joint dysplasia, Pano, allergies, ear infections, acute moist dermatitis, and cold tail. Some of the medical issues can be prevented by regular doctor checks, and if a problem arises, the sooner it is caught, the better the chances are for treatment.

5. Temperament

Labs are known for their gentle, loving behavior and are very family oriented. They are passive, loyal and playful and can be clowns. Rottweiler’s are protectors and if not properly trained, they have the potential to be aggressive. However, when properly trained and given love, they are actually very loving, playful and they love to be clowns. No matter what breed of dog you have, every dog will have its own temperament, to a degree, and a lot depends on what type of dogs their parents were, and who they get the most of their genetic make-up from. If you have children, other animals, or elderly persons in the household, training and socialization is important to create a well-rounded, happy dog.

6.  Not a good dog for first time pet owner

If you are a novice dog owner, the Labrottie is not going to be the best dog for you. This is a big breed that will require knowing how to train dogs, and how to handle a big dog. First time dog owners will find this breed a bit overwhelming and a lot of dog to handle, which can mean that the dog may not get all the proper care of training, which can be a risk for you and others, as well as a frustrating experience.

7. High potential for obesity

This is a breed of dog that has a high potential to weight gain and obesity. A Labrottie requires a lot of exercise, and it is essential they are fed a healthy diet, with measured amounts of food and meal time monitoring. If you overfeed your Labrottie or do not help him get his daily dose of outdoor and run time, he can quickly put on unhealthy weight, which can lead to health problems. It’s important you talk to your veterinarian and find out the best method of feeding your Labrottie and stick to the recommended diet plan to keep him healthy and healthy.

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