10 Fun Facts You Didn’t Know about the Continental Kennel Club

The Continental Kennel Club is a dog registry that was founded in 1991. Its registration requirements are nowhere near as strict as those of the American Kennel Club, which is something that can stir up a fair amount of controversy in certain circles of dog enthusiasts. Here are 10 things that you may or may not have known about the Continental Kennel Club:

Not One of the Top Kennel Clubs

The Continental Kennel Club is not one of the major kennel clubs with international recognition. For example, it is neither the Kennel Club, which is the first of its kind nor the American Kennel Club, which is the most famous kennel club that can be found in the United States.

Shouldn’t Be Confused with the Canadian Kennel Club

Often, the Continental Kennel Club is shortened to CKC, which is rather inconvenient because the Canadian Kennel Club is shortened to CKC as well. This is particularly irritating because the Canadian Kennel Club is one of the top kennel clubs in the English-speaking world, meaning that the issue of which CKC is which can pop up more than most people would expect.

Founded in 1991

One of the reasons that the Continental Kennel Club is held in less regard is because it was founded in 1991. Moreover, there are some sites out there that claim it was founded for the purpose of catering to bad breeders following a crackdown launched by the American Kennel Club at around that time.

Lower Standards For Registration

People who are familiar with the American Kennel Clubs and other kennel clubs of similar standing in other countries should be aware of how complicated and time-consuming it can be to get their dogs registered. In contrast, the Continental Kennel Club is much less rigorous, which can come as welcome news to some but should send up warning signals to others.

Recognizes More Breeds

It is interesting to note that the Continental Kennel Club recognizes a lot more dog breeds than the American Kennel Club. In fact, the Continental Kennel Club recognizes something along the lines of 450 dog breeds, whereas the American Kennel Club recognizes something along the lines of 150 dog breeds.

Recognizes Extinct Breeds

Curiously, the Continental Kennel Club seems to be willing to recognize dog breeds that most dog experts would consider to be extinct. For example, it recognizes the Hawaiian Poi Dog, which should raise eyebrows because the dog breed was rendered extinction so long ago that there aren’t actually any depictions of the animal that are known to be authentic. Granted, there was an attempt to recreate the Hawaiian Poi Dog in the late 1960s, but that attempt failed to produce lasting results with widespread recognition.

Lack of Documentation

People who are curious about the pedigree of a dog that has been registered by the American Kennel Club can look up said information on its website, whereas the Continental Kennel Club offers no such service. No wonder that a lot of websites caution people to be cautious when buying purebred dogs registered with the Continental Kennel Club.

Increased Convenience for People Seeking to Register Dogs

With that said, it is also no wonder that a lot of people have been flocking to the Continental Kennel Club. After all, a more rigorous registration process means increased inconvenience, which can be off-putting to a lot of people.

Less International Recognition

Unfortunately, since the Continental Kennel Club’s reputation isn’t the best, it isn’t going to get a lot of recognition from other kennel clubs in other countries, particularly since its standards for different dog breeds can seen significant differences from those of its counterparts. On the whole, this can pose a serious problem for some well-traveled people under certain circumstances.

Has a Reputation for Being Associated with Puppy Mills

Since the Continental Kennel Club makes it much easier for interested individuals to register their dogs with them, it should come as no surprise to learn that it has picked up a reputation for being associated with puppy mills. In fact, there are those who would argue that it was founded for the purpose of catering to puppy mills, which is something that would-be dog owners might want to keep in mind when searching for a reputable dog breeder.


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