Why Do Dogs Get the Zoomies and What Are They?

Like humans, dogs have different energy levels throughout the day. While they sometimes want to do nothing more than lie down and relax, there are other times when they get bursts of energy and want to do nothing but run around like lunatics. As a dog owner, you may have seen your dog chasing around your house in a sudden burst of excitement that seems to come on for no apparent reason. This is often referred to as the dog zoomies. If you have witnessed this, then you will probably have wondered what has caused this sudden burst of energy. Here is an overview of dog zoomies.

What Are Dog Zoomies?

The dog zoomies are when a dog gets a burst of energy and excitement and becomes extremely playful. They will often run frantically backward and forwards, skidding on each turn. They may briefly pause to vocalize their excitement with playful growling or barking before continuing with their fun game.

What Causes Dog Zoomies?

Dog Zoomies are more common in puppies and younger dogs than they are in older dogs. There are all sorts of reasons that can lead to a dog having the zoomies. It is usually a sign of excitement or a burst of energy. Another trigger is bathtime. Having a bath excites many dogs and when they get out of the water, they will go frantic. Sometimes a dog can have the zoomies when they are confused or stressed. For example, if you attend training classes and the exercises are challenging, they may express their confusion at the situation by having the zoomies.

What Happens Immediately Before Dog Zoomies?

Sometimes, you may get signs that your dog is about to have an episode of the zoomies. They may get a glint in their eye or start bowing in front of you or another dog. The episode may begin with them chasing their tail before they start zooming backward and forwards. The longer you have the dog, the more accustomed you will become with the signs that they are about to have the zoomies. Sometimes, it will begin with no warning.

How Can You Control This?

Dog zoomies are perfectly natural behavior for a dog. Most dogs will display this behavior at some point, though some dogs will have the zoomies more often than others. The zoomies are not something that you need to worry about and they are certainly not something about which you need to take your dog to the vet. As this is normal behavior, there is no reason for you to try to stop your dog from having dog zoomies or to control it in any way. Simply let them have the fun and it should soon be over. Most episodes of the zoomies will only last for a few minutes at a time.

Should You Chase the Dog?

It seems almost instinctive to try and chase a dog when they are having dog zoomies to catch them and calm them down. However, there is nothing more counterintuitive than doing this for two reasons. First, the dog will outrun you at each lap he does and then turn in the opposite direction leaving you trailing behind. Second, the dog will only think you are joining in their playful game and this will excite them further. The worst thing you can do is chase the dog.

There are still times when you will need to catch the dog without chasing them, such as when them having dog zoomies is dangerous. An example of this is if they are off the lead in the park or on a beach and other people or moving vehicles are around. The best way to deal with this is to get them to come to you rather than you chasing after them.

This means you will have to train your dog at home prior to them having episodes of the zoomies. In their training, make them see coming to you as a good thing. When they respond to the ‘come’ command, give them a treat and praise them with lots of affection. When you shout them to come when they are having the zoomies, they won’t see it as you trying to stop them from having fun but as a continuation of their enjoyment.


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