Flying on a Plane With Your Dog

traveling on plane with dog

When your dog is under the 20 pound limit, you will be able to take your pup on as a carry-on bag.  This is always nice because if you didn’t travel with your dog by having them with you, you would have to put them in a hard cage, which would go below with the luggage.  If they are flying below, no soft cages are allowed.  Your pup will be forced to go in a hard cage.  It would not be safe to travel with your dog on a plane and have them in a soft cage.  This is why airlines don’t allow it!  If you know that someday soon you are going to travel with your dog on a plane, you should definitely follow a certain process.  This process for traveling with your dog on a plane will assure you that your dog will be accounted for and safe.  As soon as you make reservations for yourself, you need to also make them for your dog.  Airlines usually have a limit on how many animals they can take as carry-ons and cages that will go with the below baggage.  In order to get a sedative for your dog, you must have a health certificate within tens days of the flight.  Your dog can’t fly if they do not have these certificates so that is why they are very important to get.  Even if they do not need a sedative, you still have to get a certificate to travel on a plane with your dog.

traveling with dog on plane

You can help your dog get used to being cooped up in a carrier by simply putting them in one while you are at home.  Grab some treats and be sure to give them lots of love while they are sitting in the carrier.  Close the door and let them sit in the carrier.  This will help them get used to being in the carrier which will help both of you when traveling on an airplane.  Don’t forget that you need other supplies than just the dog carrier.  You should bring a small bowl, some dog food, and any medication that they might need.  Be sure to put all of these items in a plastic baggy for security purposes.  When you are flying with your dog on an airplane, you might want to bring some toys with you.  There is no need to bring the whole toy box but bring enough to make traveling with your dog a comfortable experience.

 dog carrier for plane

At least 6 hours before the flying on an airplane with your dog, take their food and water away.  Most airports do not have a designated bathroom area for pets so it makes going to the bathroom a little difficult.  Plus, you don’t want them to go on the plane!  Before you go to the airport, you will want to take your dog out to go to the bathroom just in case they have to go.  Once you get to the airport you will obviously be going through security.  You must take your friend out of the carrier before you start to fly on the airplane with your dog.  They will have to go through security with you but they must be out of the carrier.

dog in carrier for plane

Be sure to check in on your dog while you are on the plane.  Even if they are sleeping, still check to see if everything is O.K. with the carrier itself.  You should probably have anti-nausea medication on hand in case your dog becomes sick while flying.  Don’t be shy to give them the food and treats you brought them.  Ask the flight attendant for a small bottle of water that you can put in the little bowl you brought.  If you need to give them medication, go ahead!

 dog-in-carrier-on-plane

After the flight is over and done with, your dog might still be a little sick or nervous from the flight.  Just give them a few minutes to either wake up or settle down and then you can be on your way out of the airport.  You might think that you won’t ever need to fly on an airplane with your dog, but that day will definitely come.  When it does, you will be ready!


Add Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

A Near Tragedy Gets a Happy Ending: Laneya’s Story
The Differences between Pet Food in the UK and the USA
47 Dogs in 14 States Die After PetSmart Grooming
Sony’s Aibo the Robot Dog Makes it to the U.S.
Border Collie Boston Terrier Cane Corso Chihuahua Corgi French Bulldog German Shepherd Golden Retriever Great Dane Pit Bulls Rottweiler Siberian Husky Tibetan Mastiff
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Chinook Dog
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Skye Terrier
10 Things You Didn’t Know about the Otterhound
What’s Dog Body Language Got to Do With Their Tails?
6 Gift Ideas for The Dog Lovers in Your Life
What to Know Before Giving Your Dog CBD Oil
6 Easy Tips for Cleaning Up After Your Dog
Five Ways to Help Local Homeless Animals When Adoption is Not An Option
What is Uveitis in Dogs and How is It Treated?
What is a Dog Eye Ulcer and How is It Treated?
What is Puppy Pyoderma and How is it Treated?