English Bulldog Dog Breed: What You Need to Know

English Bulldogs play nicely with kids

He’s wide and he has short legs, and that’s why it’s so easy to recognize and identify an English Bulldog. These gorgeous dogs are very unique and very easy to recognize by almost anyone, even those unfamiliar with dogs in general. With a massive head and a little bit of folded skin above his eyes and on his face, he looks almost like a wrinkly and cranky old animal, but he is actually a very sweet and docile creature with a lot to offer. This dog is one that is kind and loving, and he has a lot going for him.

Many people consider the English Bulldog because they are such great pets, and they look intimidating. Those who love this dog say that one of the reasons they love the breed so much is that it tends to scare people away with its intimidating features and wide body. What they don’t know about this breed won’t hurt them, but it is best to know what you’re getting yourself into when you decide to bring one of these darling dogs home to your family.

History of the Breed

It’s English for a reason, and that’s what gives the English Bulldog his English name. This breed is from the British Isles and was given its name because it looks a bit like the bulls that it was originally used to bait. Hundreds of years ago, this breed was very aggressive and brave, and it was so courageous that it did not hesitate to attack bulls, which is why it was used as bait for these large and in charge creatures. This practice was put to bed during the 19th century because it’s distinctly barbaric, and the dog eventually learned to develop a softer, gentler temperament than it was originally born with.

Temperament and Personality

The English Bulldog certainly looks intimidating, but he’s a bit baby doll. In fact, if you can get past his looks, you will realize immediately that he is actually one of the friendliest and most loving dogs you will ever encounter. This darling dog is so sweet and so laid back that he makes a wonderful pet. He is a great watch dog in that he’s not going to bother anyone that doesn’t have unsavory intentions, but most people have no idea that this is certainly a dog that’s more of a gentle giant than an aggressive predator. With that in mind, most people won’t try their luck with this breed.

The English Bulldog is a great dog for many reasons. For one, he’s always gentle and he loves kids of all sizes. With a high pain tolerance, it makes him less likely to notice that kids can be a little rough from time to time, and that makes you feel confident as a parent that your dogs will not harm your kids when they accidentally trip over the dog not watching where they are going. It’s very affectionate, dependable and protective of its family, and the English Bulldog is also very stubborn. This breed is one that wants what it wants and it wants it now; he’s not a dog that is going to sit back and chill when he wants something.

They’re very much dogs that love to be around people, and they are eager to please. This makes them easy to train and easy to live with whether you have a large family or it’s just you at home. As a puppy, this is going to be a breed with a lot of energy and a lot of playfulness going on, but it will calm down as it gets older.

Lifestyle and Living Conditions

The English Bulldog, as we’ve already established, is a stubborn dog. He is also a dominant dog if he does not have a dominate owner. What this means is that it’s likely he will take over and think that he rules the house if you do not make it clear to him that you are the owner and that you are the master in the house. Additionally, these are dogs that do very well with other pets in the house but are not so friendly toward pets that they do not know and spend time with.

The English Bulldog is not a highly active dog, but it is a dog that does love a long walk and plenty of time to play. They’re not very active in the house to begin with, so they make good dogs no matter what kind of dwelling you call your own. They’re great in apartments, houses and even small living spaces. As long as you walk them and take them to the park on occasion, the English Bulldog doesn’t even need a backyard of his own.

Here’s a very important tip for English Bulldog owners; never allow this breed to walk in front of you when you are out on a walk. This dog associates the person in the front as the dominant leader, and that must always be you.

Grooming

The English Bulldog has a very short coat, which is something that many people love. It needs to be brushed once a week or so to keep shedding to a minimum, and it’s not even all that necessary to bathe this particular dog regularly. These dogs are actually great with occasional baths so that their skin does not become irritated. However, you will want to gently wipe the face of this dog every single day with a soft, damp cloth to ensure that there is nothing left inside the folds and wrinkles in its face to cause unpleasant odors.

Size and Life Expectancy

The English Bulldog is not one that lives very long. If you are looking for a breed that will be around for more than a decade, this is not the dog for you. Typically the English Bulldog only lives around 8 years. He is anywhere from 12 to 16 inches tall and can weigh anywhere from 49 to 55 pounds. More or less than this by too much could indicate a health problem that a vet will need to look into.

Health

The English Bulldog is not the healthiest of dogs, either. This is a breed that is known to suffer from breathing issues thanks to their small windpipes. They have poor eyesight and are very likely to suffer from heat stroke when outdoors in hot weather. This dog is also one that is prone to tumors call mast cell tumors, skin infections, problems with their hips and their knees and it is a breed that has a significant flatulence issue. Additionally, this particular breed tends to give birth via C-Section for a number of health reasons, and litter size is typically anywhere from 4 to 5 puppies at a time.

Photo by Getty Images


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