Boston Terrier Dog Breed: What You Need to Know

Boston Terriers have an interesting background

Fun-loving and sweet, the Boston Terrier is sometimes referred to as the Boston Bull, a long-used nickname that is still used widely in many circles. This is a breed that is not large, but it does have a very large, very muscular head and a very distinct appearance. It’s not difficult to recognize this breed right away, and many people love what this breed has to offer. The Boston Terrier is not a big dog but if you do not take proper precautions to show this breed that you are, in fact, the one in charge, he can get a little out of hand with something called Small Dog Syndrome. This allows the Boston Terrier to feel that he is in charge of you, and his behavior then becomes less than ideal.

Breed History

The Boston Terrier is named aptly as it was bred and originated in Boston. It is one of only a handful of dog breeds to actually be developed here as many came over from other countries when America was discovered. It might surprise some to know that when the Boston Terrier was originally created, it was bred to weigh almost double its current max weight and it was used to fight. They were very tough, being that they were a cross between an English Bulldog and a breed called the English White Terrier, which has since become extinct.

Personality and Temperament

What you see is what you get with the Boston Terrier. He is calm, loving and very intelligent. He’s easy to train and easy to live with, and he makes a wonderful companion. He’s not a complete lap dog, but he’s also not the type of breed that has too much excess energy in the way that makes him irritating if he is not exercised or let out constantly to run off his energy. He is actually only prone to rambunctious behavior when he is not taken out at least once a day or given something to do. Because this breed is so intelligent, it does require some sort of mental stimulation so that it does not become bored. A bored dog, no matter the breed, becomes a troublesome dog.

The Boston Terrier is not a watchdog, though some people with this dog at home swear that it makes a wonderful watchdog alerting them before someone gets to the door, though it’s more common in males as females tend to remain quiet. If you have children at home, the Boston Terrier is going to enjoy your family. This breed does love kids, gets along well with people of all ages and is surprisingly gentle with those who require it. Additionally, this is a dog that’s going to get along quite well with your cat – but not always other dogs.

Size and Lifestyle

Some people see the Boston Terrier’s large head and think that it will ‘grow’ into a larger dog. It will not. It looks like it might have a bit of the bulldog family in its blood, but this is a small dog. The Boston Terrier reaches only about 15 to 17 inches tall and generally weighs anywhere from 10 to 25 pounds. As far as exercise is concerned, this little guy does not need too much. A long walk every day is going to suffice, some time playing with the kids in the yard will prove fun and entertaining, and he will be happy to go from that point forward. This is a dog that does need to stay in shape because gaining too much weight causes significant health problems in a dog that’s already this small.

Where can you live with a Boston Terrier? The good news is that you can live just about anywhere. This breed is good for anything from a smaller apartment to a big house in the suburbs. It does love to be rather lazy inside, and play time is something the Boston Terrier can find in even the smallest yards and on a long walk. Anyone living in an apartment with a Boston Terrier should keep in mind, though, that this dog should get to make a trip to the park a few times a week just for a little free play. You can expect to make the Boston Terrier a part of your family for as many as 15 years provided he or she is in good health.

When it comes to grooming your little pup, you’re not going to have much of an issue. The Boston Terrier is very easy to groom with its short hair and it’s very easy temperament. Just run a brush through his hair once a week to remove the dead hair and minimize shedding in your home. His face does require a gentle wipe on a daily basis, especially around his very large eyes.

Health Concerns

While the Boston Terrier is a sweet breed, it is also a breed that does have a tendency to suffer from some serious health issues. One of the most common health issues associated with the Boston Terrier is cataracts, which affect the eyes. Additionally, glaucoma and entropion are both common in Boston Terriers. Just as common – though not something that your dog will definitely suffer from – are a number of other health concerns.

  1. Mast cell tumors
  2. Skin tumors
  3. Heart tumors
  4. Deafness
  5. Corneal dystrophy
  6. Cherry eye
  7. Dry eyes
  8. Distichiasis
  9. Corneal ulcers
  10. Patellar luxation

Because the Boston Terrier is a small dog, there are also some concerns with his health in cold or hot weather when he plays too hard and exerts himself too much. It can then become a bit difficult for the Boston Terrier to breathe. This dog also has very pronounced eyes that are very easily injured if you are not careful with him. The Boston Terrier does overheat rather quickly, which is why it’s best to assess the weather prior to any extended walks or playtime. And just because these dogs love their owners so much, they do tend to snore and they can’t help but drool.

Photo by Getty Images

 


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