Boxer Lab Mix Dog Breed Information

Boxer Lab Mix

The Boxer lab mix or Boxador is a beautiful dog full of energy and ready to play. This breed will keep you on your toes, possibly a little too much if you’re unable to keep them sufficiently exercised. As a puppy, they’ll be even harder. The Boxer features tend to be more evident so these dogs typically look more like boxers than Labs, even if they’re a 50/50 mix. If you enjoy being outside and stay on the move, the Boxer lab mix will keep up with you.

Socialized appropriately they’ll get along well with children and other animals. You’ll want to create a safe place for the dog to go when it needs some space. If the children’s unpredictability causes the dog anxiety or high stress they can then get away for a little bit and come back when they’re ready. High-energy breeds make up most of the issues between dogs and young children as they tend to play rough without necessarily knowing the impact of their actions. You’ll need to monitor play between the two closely until the dog is trained to be adequately careful. A puppy may be unable to behave until it grows into an adult appropriately.

Other Names

  • Boxerdor
  • Boxerlab
  • Laboxer
  • Boxer Lab Mix

Description

Cute Boxador Lab Mix on a Blanket

The Boxador is a Boxer mixed with a Labrador Retriever. The typical ratio is 50% of one and 50% of the other, but that may not be true in all cases. The resulting dog is a short hair just like its two component breeds. Built similarly to one another, the combination of these two breeds tends to look more like a boxer due to the trademark coloring and significantly shorter snout. Some Boxadors look more like their Lab parent, but it’s rare.

Temperament

The Boxador has an excellent temperament. Boxers respond well to training, and Labrador Retrievers are eager to please their owners. At absolute worst, you can expect the Boxer personality. On the high energy side, the breed may get into trouble more often due to accidents or boredom.

Height, Weight

Boxer Lab Mix Puppy

The Boxer and Labrador Retriever are medium sized dogs leaving the Boxador medium sized as well.

Health Problems

Mixed breed dogs tend to be healthier overall than pure breeds, especially when it comes to inherited health issues. You’ll still want to take your Boxador in for its yearly vet check up just in case it might inherit a health condition typically found in the Boxer or Labrador Retriever blood line. If your dog does end up with a health problem that might be hereditary be sure to report it back to the breeder if possible. They can match dogs up differently in the future and see if that results in better health outcomes for the puppies.

Living Conditions

Boxer Lab Mix on his Pride Rock

Without proper exercise, the Boxador will make up activities. These are likely to include property damage. When appropriately socialized Boxers are great with other animals. In addition to the challenges posed by being a high-energy breed, a purebred boxer will sometimes be nervous and unsettled around children. Labrador Retrievers love kids and animals alike. You’ll need to socialize your dog with children carefully to see which end of the spectrum they fall on. Generally speaking, the more anxious the dog, the more children stress them out. After all, children can be extremely unpredictable.

Exercise

Both the Boxer and Labrador Retriever are high energy dogs. They’ll need a good amount of space to run around and would benefit substantially from more than the standard one walk per day. These dogs need to stretch their legs and won’t do well cooped up in a house all day, especially if the house leaves little room for them to romp.

It’s highly recommended to check the dog’s paws when they come in from a long play session, especially if it’s on a tennis court or similarly rough surface. High energy dogs are especially prone to running around so much they hurt a nail or cause abrasions to their paws. While it may sound like these things would be obvious, they may go unnoticed for a few hours — long enough to lead to infection.

Life Expectancy for the Boxer Lab Mix

Black Boxer Lab Mix

Labrador Retrievers and Boxers both have a life expectancy of around ten to twelve years. Adopting a Boxador is a long-term commitment.

Litter Size

If your Boxador is expecting, you can anticipate a litter of between five and ten puppies. Larger dogs tend to have larger litters so prepare accordingly if your dog is on the larger side. If you aren’t interested in breeding your dog then spaying or neutering your Boxador as early as possible is recommended. Local animal shelters will sometimes offer spaying or neutering services significantly cheaper than your vet.

Grooming

These short hair dogs will benefit from regular brushing but only need groomed occasionally. A bath as necessary and a brushing to remove shedding hair is likely sufficient, especially if your dog dislikes both processes. Introducing a dog to the tub and brush early and making it a positive and high praise experience will help ensure grooming is easier over your Boxador’s lifetime.

Boxer Lab Mix Recognition

  • ACHC = American Canine Hybrid Club
  • DDKC = Designer Dogs Kennel Club
  • DRA = Dog Registry of America, Inc.
  • IDCR = International Designer Canine Registry

Boxer lab mixes are great dogs. If you’re looking for a high-energy breed, they’re right up your ally. Properly socialized they’ll likely fit into your family well, whether there are children or other animals. They may need to be monitored in the beginning as their high energy leads them to play rougher than a young child might be able to handle. Proper training will reduce mishaps with a puppy and will likely eliminate them all together once your Boxador is an adult.

Long walks and open spaces are a great match for this breed. The Boxador’s low maintenance coat means more time spent outside and active. Both Labrador Retrievers and Boxers have breed-related health problems, but crossbreeds tend to be significantly less likely to acquire them. Yearly vet checkups will catch any problems your Boxador has early on.

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