10 Things You Didn’t Know About The Chipin

If you’re looking for a family dog, you might want to consider a Chipin. The Chipin is a small dog that doesn’t get very big at maturity. If you’re looking for a great companion to adopt into your family, this is a dog breed that is worth considering. The Chipin is a good choice for families or for singles who have a lot of love to give. Here are 10 things about the Chipin that you probably didn’t know, that might make you want to go right out and adopt.

1. The Chipin was bred for companionship

This designer dog breed is the result of a cross between a Miniature Pinscher and a Chihuahua. Both are toy breeds so the result is a small dog. These dogs are great companions because they exhibit fierce loyalty to their owners. They’re adorable pups that do well around children if they’re socialized from an early age and properly trained, according to Wagwalking.

2. Chipins are small dogs

A Chipin will only grow to a height of between 8 to 12 inches at full adulthood. These tiny pups usually weigh between 5 to 15 pounds. Males are generally larger than females. The precise height and weight of a Chipin depend on the size of the parents and how the genetics are passed down. This makes the Chipin ideal for apartment living or families living in a small house. They don’t take up much room and they adapt well to small living quarters.

3. Chipins learn fast

Another fun fact about Chipins is that they are intelligent dogs. They learn quickly. This makes them easy to train. You can housebreak most Chipins fairly easily. They also love to learn entertaining tricks. They’re a wonderful breed that will bring you lots of enjoyment through the years.

4. Chipins should get regular pet checkups

Although most Chipins are healthy dogs, there are a few health concerns that crop up from time to time. Common tests that vets run on this breed are eye examinations for progressive retinal atrophy and cataracts for older dogs, Spina Bifida exams, Knee and spine X-rays, and an overall general wellness checkup from time to time.

5. Chipins have a lot of names

According to Dog Time, Chipins are also known by a few other names. They are also referred to as a Minchi or a Pinhuahua. The official name for this designer breed however is a Chipin. They usually resemble a Miniature Pinscher but some puppies may take on more of the characteristics of a Chihuahua so you never know what you’re going to get until they’re here and pass the puppy stage.

6. Chipins are yappy

Although Chipins do very well in an apartment setting, there is one big potential drawback if you have neighbors nearby and thin walls. Chipins are yappy dogs. This is worse when they are puppies, but even adults will bark if they see a stranger pass by the window or if somebody knocks on the door. They’re spirited dogs who like to talk and make noise.

7. Chipins are excellent guard dogs

Although Chipins are very small pups, they will let you know if somebody enters their personal space. They are alert and watchful and if a stranger comes near they are going to let you know. This is where their happiness can be an advantage. Although they’re not very big when it comes to defending the property, you’ll know when there’s a stray dog or a stranger nearby. These dogs are very territorial.

8. Chipins are well-built

Chipins may be small in size but they have an amazing build. These pups have a well proportioned, muscular body. They are agile and strong for their size which makes it necessary to make sure they get some exercise every day. They Don’t need as much as some other breeds, but it’s important to let them out for some healthy exercise according to Doggie Designer. A daily walk is ideal because it gives you bonding time with your pet, it lets him keep his muscles in good shape and it’s healthy for humans to walk daily as well.

9. Chipins are an officially recognized breed

Dog Breed Info explains that although the Chipin is a mixed breed, it is also recognized by several different pet organizations. These include the American Canine Hybrid Club the Designer Breed Registry, Designer Dogs Kennel Club, Dog Registry of American, Inc., and the International Designer Canine Registry. Although the American Kennel Club has not yet weighed in as a supporter of the breed it has plenty of official recognitions.

10. They’re in good supply

According to Dog Lime the Chipin is a mixed breed that is becoming more popular and there are more and more of them available all the time. These dogs have an average life span of between 10 to 12 years. While you could opt to purchase your Chipin from a designer breeder, there are several good options for finding them in animal rescue shelters. Whenever you can it’s best to adopt a pet that needs to find his forever home. This mixed breed is becoming more prolific in North America. Chipins are truly amazing dogs that are great for families or for singles who need companionship. Although their lifespan is only up to 12 years, a Chipin will bring you a decade or more of love and entertainment. They help to create family memories that last forever. chipins have amazing personalities and most love to play and keep their families entertained. In the same respect, they will guard the house and the well-being of their families with every fiber of their being. They are loyal pets who give unconditional love and burrow their way into the hearts of their families.

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