What is An English Cream Golden Retriever?

English Cream Golden Retriever

The English Cream Golden Retriever isn’t a dog breed in its own right. Instead, it is just a color variation on the Golden Retriever, though it may or may not be recognized as such depending on the exact kennel club in question. As such, interested individuals should be very cautious when a dog breeder tries to sell them an English Cream Golden Retriever without being very clear about what they should and shouldn’t expect. Here are some important things to keep in mind about these dogs.

They Are Marketed Under a Wide Range of Names

English Cream Golden Retriever is far from being the sole name that sees use for these dogs. Other names include but are not limited to Platinum Retriever, Blond Golden Retriever, and Exquisite Platinum Imported Golden Retriever. Some of these names make it clear that these dogs are Golden Retrievers. In contrast, others are much more misleading in this regard. Similarly, it is very common for these names to make it sound as though English Cream Golden Retrievers are rare, which is very much not the case. The name that sees use says a lot about the intention of the dog breeder who uses it, so interested individuals should put some serious thought into it.

They Are Just a Color Variation of the Golden Retriever

Golden Retrievers might be called Golden Retrievers. However, these dogs aren’t necessarily golden in color. Originally, the Kennel Club recognized Golden Retrievers so long as they came into either some kind of gold or some kind of yellow. Over time, there was a change of opinion, with the result that the Kennel Club now recognizes cream-colored Golden Retrievers as well. Color-wise, this means that these dogs are very pale, so much so that they look white-furred even though they aren’t actually white-furred. These would be the English Cream Golden Retrievers. Speaking of which, it is important to note that cream-colored Golden Retrievers may or may not be recognized by kennel clubs, which may or may not matter to interested individuals. Both the Kennel Club and its Canadian counterpart recognize cream-colored Golden Retrievers so long as they meet the standard. Meanwhile, the American Kennel Club does not because it doesn’t accept any color other than golden, light golden, or dark golden, which interested individuals should keep in mind if they care about said organization’s opinion. Having said that, people have been known to claim that their cream-colored Golden Retrievers are light golden-colored Golden Retrievers. Something that they may or may not succeed with, particularly since those dogs show plenty of variation in their own right.

They Aren’t that Rare

As mentioned earlier, English Cream Golden Retrievers are often marketed using names that make it sound as though they are rare. That is not the case because there are plenty of cream-colored Golden Retrievers out there. Due to this, if interested individuals encounter a dog breeder who tries to sell them an English Cream Golden Retriever at a high price because of these dogs’ supposed rarity, they should look elsewhere because dishonesty in one regard often means dishonesty in others. Moving on, the price of a Golden Retriever ranges from the mid hundreds to the low thousands. This is because these dogs are neither identical nor sold in identical markets. As a result, there is a wide range of factors that can influence their price in one direction or the other. For example, a more reputable dog breeder can make for a higher price. Similarly, more prestigious bloodlines can make for a higher price as well. Interested individuals are going to need to make up their minds about which options are acceptable to them based on which factors matter to them. Of course, there are also cheaper options, with an excellent example being adopting a Golden Retriever rather than buying a Golden Retriever. That comes with a cost as well. However, that cost shouldn’t exceed the mid hundreds. In any case, checking out the price of these dogs is important, particularly since interested individuals are going to be paying for a lot of other things as well.

There Are Some Differences Between English and American Bloodlines

Golden Retrievers are Golden Retrievers whether they are in the United Kingdom or in the United States. However, it is interesting to note that there are some differences between these two populations of the same dog breed. For starters, the English dogs tend to be lighter-colored while the American dogs tend to be darker-colored, which should come as no surprise because the Kennel Club has been recognizing cream-colored Golden Retrievers for decades and decades. Furthermore, the English dogs have a stockier look while the American dogs have a leaner look, though it should be mentioned that the former tend to be a bit smaller than the latter. There are some notable differences between these two populations as well. To name an example, English dogs have a broader head than their American counterparts. Similarly, the former have round eyes while the latter have almond eyes. Regardless, this is important because it is possible for an English Cream Golden Retriever to look different from other Golden Retrievers. However, this wouldn’t be because it is a member of a different dog breed. Instead, this would be because it comes from a different population of the same dog breed. Of course, not every cream-colored Golden Retriever came from the United Kingdom, meaning that there are plenty of them that look like the American dogs because they are exactly that.

They Aren’t Healthier Because of Their Color

On a related note, it should be mentioned that there is some evidence that Golden Retrievers from the United Kingdom are healthier than Golden Retrievers from the United States. One study from 2004 revealed that 38.8 percent of the English dogs suffered from cancer, which was interesting because an even earlier study from 1998 revealed that 61.8 percent of the American dogs died from cancer. Thanks to that plus other factors, the English dogs had a somewhat longer average lifespan of 12 years plus 3 months when compared with the American dogs with their average lifespan of 10 years and 8 months. There are a number of important points to take away from this. For starters, this doesn’t mean that an English Cream Golden Retriever is guaranteed to be healthier than other Golden Retrievers. In part, this is because it may or may not be of English origin, meaning that this may or may not be applicable to it. However, the most important point is that what is true for entire populations of dogs isn’t necessarily true for every single individual dog in those populations. As such, it is very much possible for an individual dog of English origins to suffer from poor health, particularly since the English dogs aren’t that different from their American counterparts in the grand scheme of things. Interested individuals should beware of any dog breeder who tries to sell them an English Cream Golden Retriever based on the idea that such dogs are healthier. This is another example of the false claims that are sometimes used to increase their appeal, so encountering it is very good cause for skepticism and suspicion. Instead, interested individuals would be much better-off by following the usual practices for ensuring their dog’s health. For example, getting a dog from a reputable dog breeder that cares about canine health can prevent a lot of potential problems in the future. Similarly, a nutritious diet, regular exercise, and regular visits to the veterinarians can all be considered cornerstones of canine health, which is as true for these dogs as it is for other dogs.

All Golden Retrievers Can Trace Their Roots to the United Kingdom

Ultimately, Golden Retrievers can trace their roots to the United Kingdom of the 19th century. There are a number of somewhat embellished stories about how they came into existence. However, the truth is much more prosaic. More importantly, the truth is known both because the records were made and because the records managed to make it into the present time. In short, a man named Dudley Marjoribanks wanted to create the best retriever possible, with the result that he crossbred a Flat-Coated Retriever with a Tweed Water Spaniel. The dogs born of this union were crossbred with other British dog breeds, thus paving the way for the Golden Retriever that exists in the present time. Initially, Golden Retrievers were considered to be a variation of the Flat-Coated Retriever. However, their rising prominence in the early 20th century caused them to become recognized as a dog breed in their own right. After the First World War, the Golden Retriever’s appearance plus personality made it extremely popular, so much so that it managed to spread to a wide range of other countries in the Interwar period. Thanks to that, the dog breed fared better than a lot of other British dog breeds during the Second World War because the sheer number of exports meant that there was a wide breeding pool outside of the United Kingdom, thus enabling it to remain healthier than otherwise possible.

Golden Retrievers Tend to Be Good-Natured

Retrievers tend to be well-known for being good-natured. Unsurprisingly, Golden Retrievers are no exception to this rule. Generally speaking, these dogs are considered to be smart, obedient, and affectionate, which makes them well-suited for being family dogs. This is particularly true because Golden Retrievers are famous for getting along well with children. Having said that, Golden Retrievers do have their issues as well. Something that needs to be acknowledged even if these downsides are relatively minor when compared with their upsides for most interested individuals. To name an example, they are very social dogs. As a result, interested individuals shouldn’t leave them on their own for long periods of time. Otherwise, Golden Retrievers can experience separation anxiety, which can cause these otherwise very obedient dogs to act out in various ways. Moving on, these dogs tend not to make good guard dogs by default. Fundamentally, they are just too friendly, meaning that they lack a lot of the necessary instincts. Still, Golden Retrievers are very loyal, meaning that they do have a strong interest in keeping their families safe. Amusingly, even though many of these dogs are now companionship animals, they still retain a lot of their instincts as gundogs. It isn’t uncommon for them to present toys and other objects to their owners because retrievers are going to retrieve.

Golden Retrievers Need Regular Care

Like most dog breeds, Golden Retrievers need a lot of care on a regular basis, meaning that interested individuals need to be prepared for this. For instance, they are on the energetic side of things. As such, Golden Retrievers need at least a couple of walks on a daily basis. Something that can be overwhelming for more sedentary owners. Fortunately, while these dogs are quite active, they are quite capable of living indoors, meaning that there is no need for a huge amount of living space. Similarly, Golden Retrievers shed a lot, meaning that they need to be brushed twice a week. Some people might see claims that the English Cream Golden Retriever sheds less because Golden Retrievers of English origin tend to have less fur. However, less fur doesn’t mean that much of a difference for those dogs’ shedding, meaning that interested individuals will still need to provide them with regular brushing. Something that is particularly true in the spring and in the fall. On a final note, early training and early socialization are very important for Golden Retrievers. Yes, they are good-natured. Even so, that isn’t an absolute, meaning that a good upbringing is still needed to maximize the chances of the best results.

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