Pandemic Closed His Restaurant: Owner Flies to Save Dogs

Eduard Seitan is the co-owner of a Chicago restaurant. He and his partner have been hit hard by the recent Covid-19 pandemic with their city shut down due to the rising case numbers and restaurant closures. Instead of bemoaning the inability to operate their business at full capacity, he turned his attention to helping out the less fortunate. We were moved when we read his story from VOA. Seitan is a man with a mission to save rescue animals.

From restauranteur to pilot

Seitan grew up in Bucharest, Romania, his birthplace, in a mountain region of the city. He and his father listened to a popular American radio station enjoying the show “Get Out!” on Voice of America every night. He moved to the United States in 1992 and opened the Blackbird restaurant with a partner. The pair own and operate a chain of 11 restaurants with several food shops. They went from employing over 1,000 workers to trimming down to 100 when Covid-19 forced restaurant closures. Two of their businesses will not reopen. When things return to normal he will be okay, but he realized that some will not. Seitan, a long-time dog lover was recruited to begin flying missions to transport rescue animals to their new forever homes.

Eduard is a dog lover and a pilot

Seitan loves dogs and he has a spot in his heart for animals in need. In 2007, a customer offered to take him flying. He accepted and the experience rekindled his childhood dream of becoming a pilot. He bought a plane and has been flying ever since. He also found a way to help out in the pandemic. Eduard has done well in his business endeavors and he now spends his spare time helping rescue pets by flying them to their forever homes. He puts his time and money into helping these vulnerable animals and explained that this is his way of giving back to those in need.

A rise in good deeds during the pandemic

We’re seeing a rise of good deeds in America as the grim statistics continue to churn out in grim reports of surging Covid-19 numbers, business closures, and Americans out of work. According to the Good Deeds Blog, people from around the world are joining forces to do whatever they can to help out in their local communities and beyond. Seitan helps with animal rescue missions, flying pets to their new homes. In Venezuela, the national Good Deeds Day established on March 20, 2020, kicked off a movement for businesses, organizations, and volunteers to become involved in projects to ease the burden for those in need. We learned of newly opened soup kitchens to feed those in need of a daily hot meal. Fundraising to provide protective gear and equipment for healthcare workers was another major project in the country.

We’ve seen these good deeds repeated all over the world. The Lily shows us how easy it is to show kindness to those around us with gestures that mean so much in a time when people and animals are struggling for basic survival. In Tennessee, neighbors who are in lockdown maintain social distancing, but it doesn’t stop them from stocking an elderly woman’s home with food and talking with her frequently in the yard to watch over her during the lockdown. They call her around dinner time and make sure she’s eating well and gets to socialize from a distance.

A Washington State resident orders food from a struggling restaurant and gave it to the restaurant owner for his own family when the Door Dash driver didn’t show up to deliver the meal. The owner insisted on delivering the food himself. When he arrived with the order there was something extra in the delivery along with a note that thanked her for her support.

People are getting into their vehicles to drive by the homes of those who need cheering up in parades of support. They carry signs with personal and uplifting messages, honking their horns and waving to show support to those who cannot leave their homes. People are finding so many different ways to make kind gestures that come from the heart and mean so much to those who are stuck inside their homes. We can’t shake hands or give a hug like in times before, but we’re finding ways to show love and support regardless of the inability for close contact. These random acts of kindness mean so much to those who receive them.

Rallying support

The Mental Health Foundation explains that acts of kindness make a difference in the status of our mental health during these dark days. While not everyone has a private airplane to deliver rescue pets to their new homes, there are things that we can all do to improve the lives of loved ones and even strangers. Simple things like a call or text, making someone a cup of tea, helping with household chores, watching online videos together, donating to charities, having video lunches, donating to food banks, checking in on neighbors, offering free classes online, and the list goes on.

Final thoughts

Eduard Seitan is making a difference in the lives of rescue pets and the families who take them into their new homes. It’s his way of giving back during the onslaught of the pandemic. It’s uplifting to hear about the good deeds that are taking place all around us when there has been so much negativity. While some can help out on a grand scale, others can perform random acts of kindness that have a significant impact on physical and mental health. It’s nice to know that someone cares. Whether big or small these are the gestures that bring us together and show that we’re all in this global crisis together.

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