A Complete Price Guide for Siberian Husky

Siberian Husky

The Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working sled dog breed. Its origin is from the spitz genetic family and it is recognized by its furred doubled coat, erect triangular ears, and unique markings. The cost of a Siberian Husky range between 400 and 1200 dollars. Compared to other large dogs, this is much cheaper. That being said, even though the Siberian Huskies are cheap, their upkeep may be very high. This is especially the case in terms of food because they are huge and eat a lot of food. Their medical expenses are also high. They are also very active, leaving you to invest in many toys and dog walks. Their upfront cost is also considerably high as it will require getting a fairer larger kennel. Moreover, you will have to get other accompanying requirements such as the bed. While purchasing them, you will need to look beyond their price tag and consider the overall cost of owning a Siberian husky. The aim of this article is to highlight all the costs that come with buying and owning a Siberian Husky. Therefore, here is a price guide on what it would take to have and raise a Siberian husky.

Adoption cost

Due to their popularity and availability, Siberian Husky can be easily found in dog centers specializing in sheltering or rescuing dogs without owners. The challenge with these homes is that you may not know the age or the breed of the dog you are adopting. However, necessary care is given at the point of rescue at this center. This may include vaccination and treatment in case there was an underlying disorder at the point of rescue. Consequently, if they are satisfied that you can take care of the dog after adoption, they can release it at a minimal cost. If you are thinking of adopting a Husky from a dog shelter or rescue center, a budget of about 50 to 300 dollars will work for you, according to Hepper.

Cost of sourcing from a breeder

If you choose to get your Siberian Husky from a breeder, the cost will be relatively higher compared to that of adopting. The price is high because of the length that breeders go in ensuring they have the right breed. The breeder will ensure the puppies undergo recommended care as per veterinarian guidelines. Suffice to say that these dogs will fraternize before you can adopt them, with some even training them at a very young age. They also pre-select their breed, subjecting them to medical tests to eliminate undesirable characteristics passed on to the litter. Though the affront cost may appear high due to this cost that has gone into preparing these puppies in the long run, it will be cheaper. This is because it saves you high bills, especially those of treating inherited underlying issues. The price of a Siberian Husky from a breeder is between 500 and 1200 dollars.

The price of a Siberian Husky according to age

Age is a factor that determines the price if you are sourcing for a Siberian Husky. Younger puppies will cost more compared to older ones, with one-year-old costing about 350 dollars. As the adage goes, you cannot train an old dog new tricks; puppies aged between 8 to 12 weeks are the most expensive as they are easy to train; hence they are in high demand. If the budget restrains you, you can still go for an older dog from a rescue center, according to Dog Express. They will usually sell at a fair price which would only be the adoption price. These dogs are already trained, which would be okay if you were not concerned with your personalized training.

The price of a Siberian Husky according to the lineage

Where a breeder can prove that a dog bloodline can be traced, especially among those who have won accolades on dog shows, you should expect them to be more expensive. They typically seek these breeds to mix with their breed to have a pedigree to give them a show-quality puppy. In the event that you are going for a show-quality puppy, you should be prepared to spend in the rage of 500 dollars, according to Perfect Dog Breed. Therefore, it is advisable that unless you intend to participate in dog competitions, your consideration should be a quality pet that is less expensive. However, if you still want to get a pedigree Siberian Husky, you should make sure that you get one from a reputable breeder. The best way to know if a breeder is good as he or she says is by using referrals and testimonials from those that have dealt with the said breeder.

The price of a Siberian Husky according to skin color

The coat color of the Siberian Husky is a further consideration when it comes to their pricing. The Huskies are known to go with different coat colors and patterns. There are those whose color is pure white while others are black or tan, yet some have woolly skin. Note, the price for all these shall be different, although this is more of a perception issue. For instance, the pure white breed is considered more beautiful and therefore highly-priced, sometimes costing 2500 dollars. On the other hand, a woolly coat would be considered a defect, especially in snow-prone areas. This is because it will take longer for snow to dry off from their skin which can easily cause crossness. This type, therefore, is likely to be priced lower. However, it is advisable to always go for a healthier breed over color or pattern.

The price according to gender

The male or female Husky pricing is usually not different unless you consider the Husky’s lineage you want to acquire. However, the male Husky is bigger compared to the female counterpart. When considering the price of your Siberian Husky, as you will see, it should also take into account initial setup cost, feeding cost, and grooming cost, among many other costs. Therefore, the price of male husky shall eventually be higher than that of the female as they may require more food, a higher dosage of medication, and other maintenance costs.

The price according to certification

The certifications and available warranties will also influence the price of your Husky. The body regulating the breeding of Siberian Husky in America known as Siberian Husky Club provides for policies to be followed to minimize cases such as cataracts that may happen to pups when they are young. Some breeders are certified by America Kennel Club. This process of ensuring only dogs of high quality are produced is usually quite involving and expensive, and therefore, you would expect sourcing puppies from them to be more expensive. Though certification and warrant would assure you of a quality breed, you can still get quality breed from uncertified breeders. However, ensure the uncertified breeders have evidence that their puppies have undergone examinations by dog ophthalmologists.

The price of a Siberian Husky according to location

The place you are sourcing your husky will influence the price. You may have referrals of good breeders residing in distant locations or different States. In such cases, you may be forced to fly your husky, which is usually very expensive. Therefore, unless you are looking for certain dog characteristics, it is advisable to look for pups within your locality or distances you can easily drive and pick the dog.

The price of a Siberian Husky service dog

The Siberian Husky is useful as a pet and as a working dog. The main work that this type of dog will do for you is sledding if you are a snow lover, although it can be used in disaster management tasks of searching and rescuing. Full training, including certification for your Husky, will cost you somewhere between 2500 to 5000 dollars while buying a fully trained Husky will cost you as much as 100,000 dollars. What is interesting about training a Siberian Husky as a service dog is its diligence and activeness, making it enjoy the process.

The preliminary cost of setting up and providing supplies

When you are planning to get your Siberian Husky from a rescue home or a breeder, the other part of the price is the initial cost of setting up and having its provisions. You will have to consider items such as feeding bowls, collars, and identification tags. You should not forget your dog will require grooming and dental care. Other supplies therefore will include toothbrushes, toothpaste designed for dogs, and shampoo. A Siberian Husky is also known for being playful hence the need to have toys. They are also known for being a bit rougher than other dogs, which may require to keep on replacing the toys frequently. The expected cost here would range between 295 to 505 dollars.

Feeding cost

A Siberian Husky is comparatively bigger than other dogs, thus likely to consume more. The mature dog would consume more than a puppy, though you should be prepared to continue spending more as the pup keeps on growing. The average cost per month will be somewhere between 17 to 33 dollars depending on the age of your Siberian Husky. If you are using prescribed dog food that your breeder may recommend, sometimes the cost may be as high as 50 dollars. It is also important to consider buying in bulk, ensuring you enjoy the economies of scale, thereby lowering the cost of feeding. It is advisable to buy superior quality as you will only use recommended quantities, unlike food of a low quality that may not meet your dog’s daily requirements, hence becoming more expensive in the long run.

Grooming costs

Your dog will require regular grooming. Grooming is important for the health and wellbeing of your dog. A poorly groomed dog can cause infection in its skin and attract ticks and fleas. Home grooming of your Husky will cost about 9 to 30 dollars per month as they have thick fur that requires careful brushing. This breed of dog is also known to shed heavily every six months. This means you need to engage the services of a groomer, which will cost about 50 to 90 dollars per month.

Health expenses

When considering the price of your Husky you desire to acquire, the cost of health care should be part of your budget. Due to its large size, the Siberian Husky usually incurs a high cost of health care. The dosage for medicine, amount of anesthesia in case of surgical procedures, or even the level of labor shall be relatively higher. In terms of visiting your veterinarian for preventative measures that may include tests and giving vaccines, it will cost you around 55 dollars. The visits are more for pups hence higher cost in the early years of raising your Siberian Husky. If you have your Siberian Husky getting into the senior stage, the cost will also be higher. This is because they are more prone to opportunistic diseases at this stage. You will also need to do more checkups with your vet to assess things like red and white blood cells and kidney status. This will ensure that you identify and deal with any conditions early enough while they are still in the developing stage.

Insurance costs

Though most of the health issues discussed are the usual costs of raising your Husky, other serious conditions can happen to your dog and can be very costly. An example is dysplasia, which is a common condition among dogs. Hip dysplasia is said to cost in the range of 6000 dollars in surgery for each hip, while eye cataracts will cost in the range of 4000 dollars. Therefore, an insurance cover for your Husky would come in handy if you have any of these issues. Always seek to know what is covered by the insurance as some insurance firms will exclude the most expensive procedures in your policy. It will cost you about 31 to 46 dollars, although it depends on your location and the components of your policy.

Add Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Antarctica
Which Continent Are Dogs Banned from and Why?
Man Keeps Promise by Re-Adopting Pit Bull He was Forced to Give Up
Pit Bull Labrador Saved Two Teenagers During a Home Invasion
Mugsy
Dog’s Story Shows How One Act of Kindness Can Change a Life Forever
German Shepherd Golden Retriever Pit Bulls Rottweiler
Wheaten Terrier
A Complete Price Guide for the Wheaten Terrier
Coton De Tulear
A Complete Price Guide for the Coton de Tulear
Puggle
A Complete Price Guide for the Puggle
Dog Adoption Dog Training
Dry Skin
The Five Best Skin Soothers For Dogs
Snuffle Mat
Is a Snuffle Mat for Your Dog Worth It?
Dog Barking
Do Dogs Ever Get Tired of Barking?
arugula
Can Dogs Eat Arugula?
Dog Sleeping
Are Dogs Nocturnal?
Dog Medications
What is Zycortal for Dogs?
Dog Medication
What is Rilexine for Dogs