A Complete Price Guide for the Vizsla Breed

Vizsla

Are you in the market for a keen, spirited and loyal canine companion, but aren’t sure of the breed or cost? If so, then grab a muffin and some coffee, settle down in a nice easy chair and let us tell you a bit about the Vizsla, its personality and overall estimated cost. Vizsla’s are highly active dogs with a rich heritage, so its only natural for prospective owners to wonder just what goes into owning one. According to catnpuppies.com, the average cost of owning a Vizsla for its entire lifetime is around $21,445. Of course, lifetime expenses can vary from owner to owner, so we’ve broken down some of the more common expenses below. Pricing is an individual matter, and some totals will be above or below $21,445. For instance, someone who is intent on showing their Vizsla will have to add travel expenses, the cost of a professional trainer and show handler, as well as the purchase of more ‘upscale’ shampoos, conditioners and overall grooming expenses.

Brief Overview of the Vizsla

It took quite a while before the Vizsla became a recognized breed here in the states.Having been first seen in Hungary as a companion to people of the Hungarian Magyar tribes, it wasn’t until November 25, 1960 that they became a recognized breed. This means the dogs were recognized by the AKC, or American Kennel Club, and could now be registered and shown in dog shows. Some famous Vizsla show dogs are Kai and Chartay. Another well known Vizsla is Stella. She’s comedian Drew Lynch’s dog, and he often features her on videos.  The Vizsla is a sweet, happy and loving dog that is eager to make their owner happy. These athletic dogs will be in need of exercise or they do risk getting a bit pudgy. Vizsla’s get along well with people and other companion animals as long as they’ve been properly socialized. When it comes to grooming, all that’s needed is an occasional brushing. They are known as seasonal shedders, but as they are a short coated dog, maintenance will be on the low side. They are fabulously easy to train, and love to please their owners. The Vizsla’s life expectancy ranges from 12 to 14 years. Not known as excessive barkers, they do sound off if they encounter anything strange. That’s it, the Vizsla in a nutshell. Now, let’s look at the cost of keeping this gorgeous dog.

Price of Preparation: Getting Puppy Ready

Once you’ve decided that your the Vizsla is the dog for you, it’s time to prep the house for your new puppy. It’s best to purchase the basics before you bring your new family member home. There are a couple ways to get ready. First is to buy items one at a time, the other way is to purchase a puppy starter kit.

Puppy Starter Kits: $30 – $100

Puppy starter kits are a wonderful convenience to have, as they do the thinking for you, allowing you to enjoy your new pup . Each kit is different. Some concentrate on items such as treats, collars, leashes and toys, while others center on puppy beds, gates, bowls and carriers. Examine each type and get the one best for you, or purchase two or more. These are really great for first time puppy owners, as they take the guess work out of what to purchase.

Dollar Stores: $10 – $30

If you reside near a dollar store, then you might consider buying some of your supplies there. Dollar stores are a good place to purchase first-time supplies that are ‘puppy sized’. After all, they’ll grow out of them soon enough, so why spend extra? For instance,you can get a nice leash and collar for only a few dollars at dollar stores, as well as puppy treats, poop bags, and so on. These stores also have pet bowls, grooming aides, and some even carry paper training pads. Dollar Tree will give you a good idea on how much you’ll spend at a dollar store for your pups needs. Keep in mind that Vizsla’s are not only bright, but also active. As such, your Vizsla will need a constant supply of toys to occupy any slow moments in their day. That’s why considering dollar stores is a good solution for dog toys, as your Vizsla can probably tear through a ton of toys in any given year.

Puppy Health Care: $400 and up

Before you bring your Vizsla puppy home, it may be a good idea to plan your budget around their health care. This means including the cost of vaccinations, heartworm tests and prevention items, as well as possible flea and tick prevention. The costs will ultimately depend on the area were you live and what the vets charge in that area. For instance, vet charges in Manhattan, NY may be higher than in Peoria Illinois. Shop around first, to get the best deal. There are also vet offices that offer either insurance or wellness program packages, such as Banfield. These plans are created to ensure your puppy gets everything they need, which is crucial if you’re a new dog owner. Packages such as these are designed to keep health care costs down. Pet insurance is another option to purchase at this time. Wellness packages and pet insurance are two different things, so research which one will be best for you.

Professional Dog Training: $200 to $2,000

According to Homeguide.com, dog training costs vary depending on the type of class you sign up for: Hourly or weekly. For instance, costs for hourly sessions range from $30 to $80 per hour. Professional classes can run you $200 to $600/week. There are also “boot camp” classes which can run you from $500 to $1250/week. Further factors influencing cost will be the type of training required such ask guard dog training or service dog classes.

Health Issues of the Vizsla: $1000 Plus.

Overall, this breed is healthy and sound. However, when the breed was in development there existed possible inbreeding. During that time, breeders mistakenly thought that inbreeding would make the breed better. However, today we know that’s not the case, and in fact, the opposite is true. As a result, the Vizsla has several health issues which appear to frequent the breed. Let’s be clear, that not all Vizsla’s will become sick with these illnesses. In fact, most probably won’t. These are just something to keep an eye out for. The best thing is to chat with your veterinarian about it when you have your dog checked out. As such, there’s no way to gage the possible costs. A Vizsla with no health issues will just have basic vet visits, such as regular checkups. But one suffering from a health issue will cost much more. Among the most common Vizsla health issues include bleeding disorders, epilepsy, joint issues, obesity, and some food allergies. Once you’re aware of these disorders, you’ll be able to keep an eye out for symptoms. Catching any illness in time helps in the healing and treatment process.

Feeding Time: $20 to $140 per Month

Vizsla’s are large dogs, with males hitting around 24 inches at the shoulder and weighing up to 60 pounds. So, when it comes to feeding be prepared to spend around $20 to $140 dollars or more per month. These prices vary, of course, depending on the kind of food and treats you purchase. If you are going for organic, all natural dog foods, then know that it will cost much more than purchasing a 16 pound bag of dog food at the supermarketj for $20. Then there are the treats. Dog treats can also vary due to brand and quality. Finally, there are owners who choose to make home cooked meals for their dogs, that will also result in a cost difference. Need some extra help? Know that dog food calculators are a great asset if all of this is new to you,

Anti-Theft Costs: $120 to $2,000

Finally, don’t forget to have your dog micro-chipped. Microchipping costs around $20 to $50. The Vizsla is a beautiful, striking dog that is a known pure bred. These dogs can catch a nice price on the market, so are at a great risk to be stolen. First things first, if you own a Vizsla or any pure breed, don’t let it out in the yard alone. Go out with your dog when it does its business or for exercise. Next, place some good locks on your gates, which range from a simple $5 pad lock to a $300 latch.. For added protection, some dog owners install a fully enclosed, chain-link dog run, complete with locks in their back yard. These runs have cement floors, are enclosed with chain-link fencing on all sides, as well as the top. Some owners have these runs directly attached to their home. Dog runs, or outdoof kennels can go for as little as $100 and as high or higher at $2000. Other theft protection costs include motion sensitive cameras and backyard lighting.

Cost of the Vizsla from a Breeder: $250 – $3,000 or More

A Vizsla puppy isn’t cheap. The actual price will depend on the breeder, the dogs lineage or pedigree, and whether or not you’re in the market for a champion to show, or a pet. Puppy’s seen as having the attributes of a show dog will run you much more than a puppy that is seen as pet quality, so know that before you go to a breeder.

How to Find a Reputable Vizsla Breeder

Unfortunately, we’re living in a world of puppy mills and backyard breeders. Before you go to a breeder, it’s crucial you know what to look for, and what questions to ask to ensure you don’t get taken by the unscrupulous. That being said, there are plenty of pointers which will help you search for a reputable Vizsla breeder. First, a reputable Vizsla breeder will keep their dogs in clean conditions. Dogs will appear to be well-nourished, active and eager to meet people. Red flags should go off if any dogs appear withdrawn, or shy. This means they have been poorly socialized and could end up to be biters, and cost you much when it comes to retraining them. Responsible breeders encourage and expect you to ask questions, and make several visits to their establishment. These breeders assure you that they will always be there for you, even after you purchase your dog. Responsible breeders also have no problem when it comes to furnishing references from previous buyers. Most will be happy to show you the parents of the puppy, so you can see how they react, as your puppy will be a reflection of the parents health and behavior. A responsible Vizsla breeder will want to check you out as well, as they don’t want to give their pups to just anyone. There will also be a sales contract which will contain conditions that you’ll have to meet. Finally, they have no problem showing you the vet records of any dogs or pups you’re interested in.

Adoption: $150 – $250

If you’re reason for purchasing a Vizsla is for companion purposes only, then please consider taking the adoption route. There are many Vizsla rescue organizations in the United States. Reputable Vizsla rescue groups will have healthy dogs, dogs which have seen a vet for check ups and vaccinations. With regards to cost, this depends on the rescue group. Some can go as low as $150, while others for much more, such as over $250. Usually the adoption fee depends on what the rescue did for the dog. In other words, they take into consideration not only food, but also any vet visits, or spay/neuter costs. Regarding spay/neuter costs, know that most rescues will not release a dog to someone until it has been ‘fixed’ first. There is a massive over population of dogs in this country, so dogs leaving a rescue organization must be fixed so they don’t contribute to the problem.

Final Thoughts

There you have it, a primary cost guide to owning a Vizsla. Remember when purchasing your dog, the cost is not just the cost of the dog itself, but all the extras that come with it. These extras include medical care, food, toys, and supplies like leashes and poo poo bags. Vizsla’s are alert, smart and intuitive dogs that require a good deal of activity to avoid becoming bored, so even turning to the unconventional methods of exercise, such as purchasing a doggie treadmill can have tremendous benefits for your Vizsla. Other costs may include that of a professional dog trainer, dog walkers, boarding expenses or groomer. Finally, it pays to become familiar with the common health ailments of the Vizsla dog, whereby you can be ready to have them taken to the vet, using money from a ‘rainy day’ fund.

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