A Complete Price Guide for the Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier

When first considering bringing an animal home, you may have your heart set on one specific breed. After all, many people gravitate towards certain animals for many different reasons, including they’re adorable, fit well in a family, or their size is perfect for your space. Suppose you have your heart set on a Yorkshire Terrier, congratulations. Bringing these pocket-sized pets home is a rewarding experience. The breed not only has a fascinating history, but they are also one of the smartest of the toy breeds. According to Embora Pets, many small breeds typically score low on intelligence tests. However, a Yorkie is above the pack. Perhaps it’s because they were initially a working breed. The breed’s history traces back to the 1800s and is named after a region of England. Weavers were the first to breed the Yorkies from several different types of terriers. They started in factory portions of England. They were first used to catch rats since these pint-size cuties can easily blend in and fit into small spaces. It’s also rumored that hunters carried them in their pockets when hunting deer. The crossover to the breed’s current status happened as more people learned about the breed. Beyond wanting the Yorkie for its intelligence, many people fell in love with its silky coat. According to The Farmers Dog, in 1885, the AKC started listing them as a recognized breed. Even if all of this piques your interest and makes you even more confident you want to bring a Yorkie home, there are still many considerations and things you should do before bringing your tiny four-legged home. This is the complete guide to purchasing and owning a Yorkshire Terrier.

Is A Yorkie Right For You?

Before bringing home your Yorkie, the first thing you should consider is your lifestyle. This breed is not an excellent choice for someone who works long hours. Yorkers need more attention than the average dog and will not be shy about letting you know their malaise about being left alone. You can crate train them early in life to stave off this issue. Nonetheless, they do not do well staying cooped up for an extended time. Remember, despite their current reputation, they are active workers and want to be running around enjoying life. Another consideration is what other pets and people you have. Yorkies are as loyal as the next dog but typically don’t do well around other dogs, significantly larger breeds. You may have better luck if you have them around larger breeds for a time before bringing one home. These dogs can also be fussy with little ones, so you may need to choose a different type of dog if you have curious toddlers.

Before You Bring Them Home

Like most puppies, you will want to ensure that your house is ready for their arrival. It’s best to have everything you’ll need since you want them to come home and feel like part of the family. Let’s look at some of the things you’ll want to consider. Diet is an important one to think about. When I brought home my puppy, I know I was obsessed with the right food. Many foods have tons of recalls, so some research is the best way to go.

Much like you or your family goes to a doctor, your Yorkie will need one that will be there for necessary shots and scheduled check-ups. You’re also going to want one who takes the same approach you want for your pet’s life. For example, if you want your puppy to have a holistic lifestyle, or if you prefer a vet who has a lot of experience with the breed. You don’t have to buy the most expensive food on the market, but you’ll want to ensure that what you decide to feed them doesn’t contribute to poor health. Dogfood Guide provides a great list to get you started. The site states that one of the reasons food is so essential is that Yorkies may overeat, mainly because they typically spend their life as a lap dog. You may decide to crate train them. When selecting a crate, you’ll want to make sure it’s large enough for them to be cozy but not so big they have too much room to get into trouble. Additionally, you’ll want to make sure you have a scent-free detergent for your little ones’ bedding since heavy scents can make them sick. After all, if they’re a puppy, chances are they’ll have some accidents. Just remember, you don’t want to keep them in a crate for an extended period of time. It can make them feel abandoned and contribute to unwanted behaviors. Toys are another thing you’ll want to consider. It’s best to choose a few simple toys and see what your Yorkie gravitates towards. After all, each dog has their preferences, and many do not like the overpriced stuffed animal you thought was too cute for words. Still, you want them to come home with nothing to do.

Bringing Your Yorkie Home

If you have your heart settled on a Yorkie, you’re going to want to find a reputable breeder. It’s likely you’ve read a lot about puppy mills and may even wonder if you’re contributing to the problem. Never fear! You can find your favorite breed from someone reputable. You may also look at your local shelter if you don’t mind if yours isn’t AKC certified. Suppose you want to rescue a Yorkie look for a sanctuary specializing in finding a home for abandoned dogs. It’s best to consider your budget if you fall in love with one that has health problems or is a senior. You’re doing a fantastic thing bringing them home, but if you aren’t financially able to provide them the best care, it’s best to get a younger one. Remember, your dog will still need to see a vet so that you won’t be free of these bills. The early days with your Yorkie will be filled with ups and downs. If you have a puppy, you may need to get up in the middle of the night to take them out. Also, no matter how cute they are and want to spoil them rotten with no rules, you’re going to have to establish boundaries. After all, you don’t want a pint-sized terror who thinks that they own the house.

First Days

You may want to hold your Yorkie and be right there by their side, thinking this will help reassure them and help them feel more comfortable. Yes, they will want love and affection, but your Yorkie will also need to get acclimated and may feel a little shy and overwhelmed bout their new surroundings. Before you let them walk around and take a look around, you’ll want to show them all their special spots. They need to know where their food and water dishes are as well as a puppy pad if you decide to use one. If you’ve decided on a crate, you should also show them where it is, and if they walk in without a fuss, give them a treat and praise them. When they start to walk around the house, you don’t need to stoop down with them but make sure you’re close at hand if you need to redirect them or if they get scared. Routine is also crucial for your puppy. Setting expectations early helps them feel more secure and at home in your house. The first night with the puppy may be rough. If they aren’t used to a crate, they may whine. However, you’ll need to stay firm. After all, you don’t want to cave in to their wishes only to have to start from scratch and train them again. It may be a little tough for your puppy; after all, if they were with their brothers and sisters, they’re going to feel some separation anxiety.

Something you may not have considered is a bedtime routine. This is your fur baby, and much like a child, they need the calm structure of a daily routine. First, you’ll want to take them outside to relieve themselves. This will help, although it may not eliminate the possibility of an accident in their crate. Then, you’ll want to take them to the crate and say bedtime or your chosen word, like night night. You’ll want to make sure you say the same term each night, so they learn the command. Also, it’s best to keep it simple. Going back to the separation anxiety, you’re more than welcome to go to their crate and comfort them but stand firm and don’t take them out. This will be tough, but you can do it! After you put them to sleep, you might want to consider going to sleep yourself. Going back to the analogy of a newborn baby, your new puppy will need to go out in the middle of the night. Yorkies have small bladders, and if they’re young, you want to give them to learn to go outside. If the first night is difficult, take heart, it will get easier in time.

How Rewarding

With all the things you need to consider before getting a Yorkie, you may feel a bit overwhelmed. It’s ok; we’re going to look at some of the wonderful things you can expect when you bring them home. They are one of the best small breeds and will give you a lifetime of happiness. If you live alone, you will undoubtedly love having one because they adore attention. They’re constantly going to want to be on your lap and curled up with their human. You will also have lots of fun taking them outside. Yorkies enjoy going out and have a lot of exercise. Also, since their coats require a lot of maintenance, you can dress them up and put cute bows on them. This will only add to their adorable appearance since they are one of the most striking dogs in the terrier breed. You will also enjoy their companionship. Yorkies are talkative breeds and will tell you what’s up. Even though you’ll notice a stubborn streak, chances are you’ll get to know and love their decisive attitude and never question what they’re feeling or needing.

Final Words

John Grogan once said, “it’s amazing how much love and laughter they bring to our lives and even how much closer we become with each other because of them.” Grogan is famous for his columns about his dog named Marley, made famous in the 2008 film with Jennifer Aniston and Owen Wilson. Grogan is right; owning a dog is one of the most rewarding parts of life. You get unconditional love and a companion who is always happy to see you arrive home when you own one. Yorkies, with all their sass and stubbornness, will bond with you in a way you’ll never be able to imagine unless you own one. Once they decide you’re their person, they will be loyal to you and crave your attention more than many other dog breeds. After reading this guide to owning them, I hope that you’ll feel confident in your decision to bring one home. It won’t always be easy owning one of these pint-sized fur babies, but the rewards will definitely be worth it! After the initial time of getting them settled, you will have a new member in the family who will be a great addition and make your world complete.

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