10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Prazsky Krysavik

While some dog breeds are well known around the world, other dog breeds are not as well known and are rarely found outside their country of origin. One example of such a breed is the Prazsky Krysavik, which is also known as the Prague Ratter. If you are unfamiliar with this breed, you are unlikely to know much about its personality traits or characteristics. Those who intend to welcome this dog into their home should learn as much about the breed as they can. Here are 10 things you didn’t know about the Prazsky Krysavik.

1. The Prazsky Krysavik Originates from the Czech Republic

The Prazsky Krysavik originates from the Czech Republic, and it is rarely seen outside of Europe. There is evidence that the breed was around prior to the 11th century, as they were popular in central European palaces at that time. The breed was already established by the time of Polish king Boleslaw II the Generous’ rule between 1058 and 1081, as it was his favorite breed.

2. It is the World’s Smallest Breed

The Prazsky Krysavik is often mistaken for both the Chihuahua and the Mini Pinscher, as they are all toy breeds. People often mistakenly believe that the Chihuahua is the smallest breed in the world, but that is not the case. Chihuahuas are measured by weight, but breed standards measure size by height. As the Prazsky Krysavik is shorter than the Chihuahua, it is the smallest dog breed in the world. The Prazsky Krysavik is also two inches shorter than the Mini Pinscher. The Prazsky Krysavik is between seven and nine inches tall, and they weigh between two and six pounds, says Dog Breed Info.

3. There Are Two Coat Variations

The Prazsky Krysavik has two coat variations, as some have a short coat that is smooth and glossy, while others have a long coat with fringes on their limbs, ears, and tail. Black and tan is the most common color combination, although other bicolor combinations include lilac and tan, brown and tan, and blue and tan. Other colors include yellow, merle, red, and pink. This breed is classed as an average shredder. On the one hand, they are not the best option for those with allergies. On the other hand, they will not shed so much that you will spend lots of time cleaning up dog hair. The long-haired variety of this breed needs brushing once a week, while the short-haired variety only needs wiping with a damp cloth each week.

4. They Were Originally Rat Hunters

Although most people keep the Prazsky Krysavik as companion dogs, people originally used them in working roles. They were often used for hunting rats on farms, as they are the perfect size for this role. They also have the right traits for rat hunting, as they are intelligent and active dogs with an excellent sense of smell.

5. The Prazsky Krysavik is Easy to Train

Due to their intelligence, the Prazsky Krysavik is usually an easy breed to train. They are known for their ability to learn many commands and tricks. There are even examples of owners that have trained this breed to use a litter tray. Like most breeds, they do not like criticism and respond best to positive reinforcement during training. It would be best if you also started the socialization of your Prazsky Krysavik as soon as possible so that they can become accustomed to other dogs and strangers.

6. They Are Prone to Small Dog Syndrome

One reason that consistent training is essential with this breed is that it is prone to small dog syndrome. If allowed, they will try to dominate situations and will consider themselves the head of the family. You must let them know that you are the boss from the start. There are various behavior problems associated with small dog syndrome, including excessive barking, guarding, and domineering. Occasionally, it can also lead to aggressive behavior.

7. They Are an Active Dog Breed

Each breed has different personality traits. One of the most notable traits of the Praszky Krysavik is their active and playful nature. Although they are only small, they need a short walk every day, and they will also enjoy playing games with their owner. Their intelligence and high activity levels mean they are well-suited to taking part in agility and obedience events.

8. The Prazsky Krysavik is Suitable for Apartment Living

Not all dogs are suitable for living in all environments, and some dogs are best suited to living in a large house with a garden. If you live in an apartment, then many breeds are not suitable for this lifestyle. The Prazsky Krysavik is a good option for apartment living due to its small size. However, it is still important that you take your dog for a daily walk as they are an active breed, and exercise is essential for their health.

9. They Are Susceptible to Bone Injuries

Due to their small size and delicate bones, this breed is susceptible to suffering bone injuries, especially to its legs. Although they are a friendly breed suitable for family life, it is best if a Prazsky Krysavik does not live in a household with small children. Younger children often do not take enough care with dogs and may handle a small dog roughly, leading to injury. They are also prone to joint problems, such as patellar luxation.

10. The Prazsky Krysavik Was Acknowledged by the FCI in 2019

During the 19th century, the popularity of the Prazsky Krysavik began to decline. However, it regained popularity in the 1980s, and people in Slovakia and the Czech Republic began to breed them again. The Prazsky Krysavik was not recognized as a breed by the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) until 2019. Since then, the breed has participated in events and competitions in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Scandinavia.

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