Stray Dogs with Blue Fur are Found in Russia

In February of 2021, Russian media reported the existence of seven stray dogs with blue fur in Dzerzhinsk. This generated a lot of interest, so much so that the local authorities took the dogs in for the purpose of checking up on their health. Fortunately, the Dzerzhinsk dogs seemed to be happy as well as healthy, though it is still unclear how they winded up with blue fur. Curiously, stray dogs with green fur soon showed up in Podolsk. However, it is unknown if someone painted them green as some kind of response to the initial news. In any case, the Podolsk dogs also seem to be happy as well as healthy. Something that should come as welcome news to animal lovers.

What Can Cause Something Like This to Happen?

Although the cause of the colored fur is unknown, there is more than enough information to speculate. In short, the Dzerzhinsk dogs were seen close to a derelict glass factory. As a result, chances are good that they winded up with blue fur by coming into contact with powdered blue dye. Still, there were concerns that they had come into contact with something more hazardous, which explains much of the concern for their well-being. Meanwhile, the Podolsk dogs were seen close to a derelict warehouse that is known to have stored powdered green dye. Theoretically, it is possible that the dogs were painted thus by people, particularly in the second case since it happened after the first case had turned into a media sensation. However, the fact that the dogs seem to get along with humans suggests otherwise.

As for the dogs getting into derelict structures, well, suffice to say that is something that can happen everywhere. Keeping buildings secured costs money, so if something has been abandoned, chances are good that its security is either nonexistent or on a one-way slope headed towards nonexistence. For that matter, there is nothing mysterious about the powdered dye. It isn’t a particularly precious substance, so selling it might have been the costlier and more time-consuming option than just leaving it be.

How Do Stray Dogs Survive?

It is very common to hear people bring up the close relationship between man and man’s best friend. However, it is important to note that the pet dog as we think of it is a rarity, as shown by the estimate that more than 70 percent of the dog population is made up of free-ranging dogs. Of course, free-ranging dog is a term that encompasses a wide range of animals living under a wide range of conditions. First, there are free-ranging owned dogs, meaning animals that are permitted to roam about but have one or more human owners. Village dogs would be excellent example of such animals. Second, there are free-ranging unowned dogs, which often live in human-dominated environments but have no human owner whatsoever. Both feral dogs and stray dogs fall under this category, though the line between the two can blur under certain circumstances. Third, there are people who believe in the existence of wild dogs, meaning those that have been independent from humans for so long that they should be considered to have lost their domesticated status. One popular candidate for being a wild dog would be the dingo, though this is a much-debated topic to say the least.

In any case, free-ranging dogs tend to live what most of us would consider to be less than desirable lives. After all, most of them live in human-dominated environments that aren’t exactly bursting with opportunities for them. Thanks to this, there is a hard limit on the number of free-ranging dogs that can be supported by the available resources in most places. Such limits tend to be particularly hard-hitting for pet dogs that become stray dogs and stay stray dogs because learning by doing can be extremely dangerous when the consequences involve life and death. Unfortunately, free-ranging dogs can create serious issues for humans. Generally speaking, they will seek to avoid humans rather than attack humans. However, there are cases of free-ranging dogs attacking humans for one reason or another. In some places, this is particularly serious because of the potential for them to spread rabies to humans. Besides this, free-ranging dogs can also create nuisances such as feces, excessive noise, and unwanted smells. All of which can result in lower quality of life for local people.

Of course, there are more positive stories that come from this as well. For instance, interested individuals can find a lot of stories about the impressive ways that free-ranging dogs have adapted in order to survive. One excellent example is how street dogs in Moscow have managed to learn how to ride the subway, which is not just a remarkable show of intelligence but also a remarkable show of their ability to remain calm in spite of the packed conditions and constant noise. Similarly, other dogs in other cities have demonstrated the ability to cross the street, thus enabling them to make their way through urban landscapes without being struck by vehicles in the process.

On the other side of things, there are also a lot of people who are helping out free-ranging dogs in one way or another. Sometimes, their efforts are very impromptu. A lot of people are either unable or unwilling to take in free-ranging dogs. However, even so, many of them are willing to offer various kinds of assistance such as food and makeshift shelters. Other times, people help out in much more organized ways. This can be seen in the various animal welfare organizations that work to provide these animals with food, shelter, and medical care while working to combat the problem as a whole through measures such as spaying and neutering. Moreover, as more and more regions develop, it seems that the concern for these animals is spreading further and further. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem as though there will be a perfect solution anytime soon. Free-ranging dogs have been with us since prehistoric times and free-ranging dogs promise to remain with us into the foreseeable future. That can make acts of charity seem pointless. However, even if people can’t help out every single free-ranging dog out there, they can still make an enormous difference in the lives of one or more animals.

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