10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Treeing Tennessee Brindle

The Treeing Tennessee Brindle is a relatively new breed of dog from the United States. It makes both a good working dog and family pet due to its intelligence, loyalty, and pleasant nature. This breed’s records have been maintained as part of the Foundation Stock Service Program of the American Kennel Club. It is a small breed of dog that is usually under two feet in height. If you do not know much about this breed, here are ten interesting facts about the Treeing Tennessee Brindle.

1. They Have Been Around Since the 1960s

This is a relatively new breed of dog as the development of the breed did not begin until the 1960s. Reverend Earl Phillips gathered information about treeing dogs, which are also known as curs, so that he could develop his own breed. The Treeing Tennessee Brindle was developed using a variety of other breeds and mongrels from the area between the Appalachian Mountains and the Ozarks.

2. There Are Two Color Variations

There are just two color variations of the Treeing Tennessee Brindle. The majority of this breed are brindle, while there are also some that are black. A few of this breed have white marking in areas such as their chest or feet and this is acceptable according to the breed standards.

3. There is a Treeing Tennessee Brindle Breeders Association

Just for breeders of this breed, there is a Treeing Tennessee Brindle Breeders Association. This was established on March 21, 1967 by Reverend Earl Phillips who first developed the breed. This association was based in Illinois.

4. They Were Originally Hunting Dogs

The reason why this breed was developed was to work as hunting dogs. The aim was to create a breed that was smaller than the Plott, but could complete the same type of work, including climbing trees to catch their prey. Many people still keep Treeing Tennessee Brindles as hunting dogs.

5. Hip Dysplasia is a Common Health Problem

This dog is a breed that does not have too many health conditions to which it is prone, and a healthy dog will usually live for between 10 and 12 years. However, one problem that is relatively common among Treeing Tennessee Brindles is hip dysplasia. Other than this, they only have the same risk as other breeds of suffering from other condition.

6. They Do Not Need Lots of Grooming

One of the main advantages of opting for this breed as a family pet is that they do not need lots of grooming, so they are easy to care for. They generally need brushing once or twice a week and bathing only a few times each year. The coat of the Treeing Tennessee Brindle is short and soft. This breed is not known to shed too badly.

7. They Require Strict Training

Although the Treeing Tennessee Brindle is an intelligent breed of dog, they do require strict training to get them to their best and to make sure they behave in a variety of situations. It is best that they are trained by a dog handler or someone with experience of training this breed. With the proper training, this dog can become very well behaved in all environments.

8. The Breed Was Recognized by the AKC in 1995

Despite the development of this breed beginning during the 1960s, it wasn’t until 1995 that they were recognized by the American Kennel Club. However, it is not yet officially eligible for registration, hence the records being kept in the Foundation Stock Service.

9. They Are Good Climbers

As this breed was specifically bred to hunt in trees, hence their name, they are excellent climbers. This is an advantage if you are keeping a Treeing Tennessee Brindle of the purpose of hunting. However, if you are keeping one as a pet, it can be problematic in a variety of situations. Unless they are properly trained, they will climb the furniture and chase cats up trees while you are out on a walk.

10. They Howl a Lot

Another tendency of this breed is to howl a lot. They do this for lots of different reasons, but many owners find it annoying. If you want to reduce the amount of howling they do, it is important that you include this in their training program from a young age.

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