Is Your Dog 10-Years-Old? Here’s What You Need to Know

At different stages in your dog’s life, you will notice different things. A dog that reaches double digits is officially a senior dog, so they will begin to experience some changes around this time. However, the breed of dog you have will depend on the nature of these changes as smaller dogs age more slowly than larger dogs. Here are some of the things you can expect from small, medium, and large dogs when they reach the grand old age of 10.

Medium and Large Dogs at 10

Medium and large dogs are considered well into their senior years by the time they reach the age of 10. This means that you will notice they are gradually slowing down. Although your dog may still run around and play, they may also sleep more and take longer to rise from their sleep. This is often because the dog has begun to develop arthritis. It is worth considering giving your dog supplements to help with their arthritis. The best supplements for this condition contain chondroitin, MSM, and glucosamine. You should also see your vet about a prescription for pain medication if you believe your dog is suffering a lot of pain.

Regardless of whether your dog is suffering from arthritis or is in pain, you should still take your dog for a veterinarian examination twice a year once it reaches the age of 10. At this age, various aspects of your dog’s health may begin to deteriorate, and your veterinarian can give your dog a full check-up. They will look at their teeth and ear to check for deterioration and listen to their heart and lungs. They may also conduct blood tests to check organ function as some organs, such as the liver, may begin to deteriorate as your dog gets older. The vet can then advise you regarding any course of action you need to take to maintain the health of your dog.

Smaller Dogs at 10

At the age of 10, smaller dogs that weigh under 30 pounds are considered middle-aged as smaller breeds often live as long as 17years. Therefore, they will not necessarily have the same changes and health problems as medium-sized and larger dogs. They may have slowed down a little since being a puppy, but they have not lost all their energy and remain playful. It is unlikely that a smaller dog will suddenly need extra sleep or have difficulties with mobility at this age.

Although they do not show the same level of deterioration as medium-sized or larger dogs of the same age, this does not mean that there is no deterioration. One area of their health that may begin to suffer around this age is their dental health. Your dog’s teeth may begin to show signs of their aging and they can develop dental problems that may affect both their teeth and their gums. The best way to manage this situation is to maintain a good dental health routine for your pet. You should also get your dog a dental check-up with your veterinarian at least once a year to check their general dental health. If you notice any specific problems, then you should take them sooner. Some signs to look out for are bad breath, decaying teeth, and difficulty eating.

Even if you haven’t noticed any specific problems with your smaller dog, you should still start to take them for a veterinarian examination once a year once they reach the age of 10. This means that any deterioration in your dog’s health are picked up early and you can then have your dog treated to reduce the likelihood of further problems developing.

A Dog’s Hearing at 10

Regardless of the size of your dog, their hearing may begin to deteriorate when they are ten years old or older. You may notice that your dog is less responsive to commands they know, especially if you are stood behind them or in another room and they cannot see you. A trip to the vet will confirm if your dog is suffering from hearing loss.

One way to overcome the problem of your dog’s hearing loss is to start using sign language. A dog trainer can teach you how to use visual cues to replace the verbal commands you have previously used with your dog.


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