10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Peke-a-Tese

Peke a tese

Two dog breeds are often mixed to create hybrid or designer dogs. These types of dogs are often created so that the resulting hybrid has a combination of the positive features of both breeds. When choosing any dog breed, including designer dog breeds, it is essential that you find out as much as you can about the breed’s physical characteristics and personality traits. Doing so will help you to determine if it is the best option for you and your lifestyle. One designer breed that you might consider is the Peke-a-Tese. Although it is a popular and established hybrid in the United States, it is still not recognized by the American Kennel Club. Here are 10 things you might not know about the Peke-a-Tese.

1. One Parent is a Maltese

One of the parents of a Peke-a-Tese is a Maltese. The Maltese is an ancient dog breed that originates from Malta, and there are written records of this dog dating back to the 5th century. During the 14th century, forces invading the island stole the dogs to take them home, which meant the popularity of the breed grew outside Malta. By the 1800s, the Maltese was popular in the United States, and people were showing this breed in competitions. The Maltese was first recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1888.

2. The Other Parent is a Pekingese

The other parent of a Peke-a-Tese is a Pekingese, which is also an ancient dog breed. It originates from China and is named ager the capital city Peking, which is now called Beijing. The Pekingese was one of the most popular dog breeds to keep as pets in China for many centuries, and they became known as the ‘Lion Dog of China.’ Their popularity in other countries grew when the dogs were given to foreign diplomats as gifts during the reign of the Dowager Empress between 1861 and 1908. They were first recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1909.

3. They Are Available in Various Colors

A Peke-a-Tese’s coat is medium to long and straight. Although they all have the same type of coat, they are available in various colors. These include cream, white, black, gray, brindle, and fawn. In most cases, a Peke-a-Tese has a solid coat of only one color. Usually, they have a black nose and brown eyes. Other features of the breed are wide-set eyes, a short snout, a flat crown, and small, pendant ears.

4. The Peke-a-Tese is a Small Dog Breed

The Peke-a-Tese is classed as a small designer dog breed. Females are between eight and ten inches tall and weigh between six and nine pounds. Males are slightly larger, as they measure between eight and 11-inches tall and weigh between eight and 11-pounds. It is essential your Peke-a-Tese maintains a healthy weight for their gender and size, and you can help them to do this by making sure they eat a healthy and balanced diet.

5. They Need Regular Grooming

Due to the length of their coat, the Peke-a-Tese needs regular grooming. It is recommended that you brush the coat of your Peke-a-Tese every day. You will also need to bathe your Peke-a-Tese regularly to make sure its coat does not become tangled or matted. Due to potential problems with their dental health, you should also clean their teeth daily. It is important to take this into consideration when deciding whether this hybrid is the best option for you.

6. The Peke-a-Tese Can Suffer from Separation Anxiety

Although the Peke-a-Tese has many positive attributes, there are also some negative traits that you should know about. One of these is that the Peke-a-Tese is prone to separation anxiety. They become easily stressed if they are left alone in the house for long periods. Therefore, this designer breed is best suited to a household where there is somebody at home most of the time.

7. They Are Suitable for Apartment Living

If having the time or energy to exercise a dog regularly is something you are worried about, then the Peke-a-Tese is a good option. They only need around 20 minutes of exercise a day, says Wag Walking. Although they will need a walk a couple of times a week, you can encourage 20 minutes of playtime on the other days to keep them active. As this designer breed does not need lots of room to exercise, they are a good option for apartment living.

8. Most Peke-a-Tese Dogs Are Happy to Live with Children

Those who have children need to consider which are the best breeds to have around their family. While some breeds do not fit in well with a family environment, other breeds are fantastic with children. If you have children, then a Peke-a-Tese is a good option, as they get on well with humans of all ages, and they do not have an aggressive streak. Similarly, most Peke-a-Tese dogs get along well with other dogs.

9. They Are Loyal to Their Owners

One of the most positive attributes of the Peke-a-Tese is its loyalty to its owner or family. They are loving and affectionate dogs that love spending time with humans. The downside to this is that the breed demands attention, but the plus side is they will raise the alarm to protect their family. Other positive personality traits of the Peke-a-Tese are that they are obedient, playful, and good company.

10. There Are Some Health Conditions Associated with this Breed

Like most breeds, there are some health conditions associated with this designer dog breed. Some of these include patellar luxation, skin fold dermatitis, entropion, obesity, brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome, patent ductus arteriosis, and exposure keratopathy syndrome. Other minor concerns associated with this breed are cryptorchidism, hydrocephalus, dental disease, shaker dog syndrome, mitral valve disease, and portosystemic shunt.

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