10 Things You Didn’t Know About The Giant Schnoodle

Giant Schnoodle

Designer dog breeds are becoming more popular. Breeders work with two dog breeds to create a hybrid that inherits desirable traits from each parent and the results are in some cases intriguing. The Giant Schnoodle is one such breed that combines a giant Schnauzer with a poodle. It’s the ideal solution for pet owners who love both breeds because they get the best of each in one hybrid pooch. Here are 10 things you probably didn’t know about the Giant Schnoodle.

1. Giant Schnoodle puppies are always a surprise

Dog Breed Info explains that the Giant Schnoodle is not a purebred breed. It is considered a mixed breed perpetuated through multiple generations. Giant Schnoodles developed from a cross between Standard Poodle and Giant Schnauzer breeds. There is no guarantee that the puppies are a fifty percent mix of both parents. Some generations receive more Schnauzer, others receive more Poodle genes. The results may be any combination of temperaments and physical traits. You never know what you’ll get when a new litter of puppies is born.

2. Giant Schnoodles are recognized by five canine organizations

Although the American Kennel Club does not recognize the Giant Schnoodle as an official dog breed, several organizations do. The dog is recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club, the Designer Breed Registry, the Designer Dogs Kennel Club, Dog Registry of America, inc., and the International Designer Canine Registry. The breed gets plenty of support to legitimize the hybrid’s status as a dog breed, even though it’s still considered a mixed breed of dog.

3. Giant Schnoodles are loyal dogs

Pet Guide confirms that Giant Schnoodles are loyal to their owners and their families. They are loyal dogs that enjoy spending time with their human families. They are not usually prone to barking. When strangers enter the scene, they keep their eyes on them. Giant Schnoodles will switch into the role of watchdog when a potential threat to loved ones is near. They’re also big cuddlers who enjoy sitting at your feet or lying across your lap on the couch at night. Giant Schnoodles crave contact with their humans.

4. They’re curious

Giant Schnoodles are intelligent dogs with an inquisitive nature. They like to know what’s going on in their environments. They are alert dogs that tend to scan their surroundings for new things to investigate. It’s best to keep them securely confined within a fenced yard to prevent wandering off in search of a new adventure.

5. They’re low-shedders

Although Giant Schnoodles have ample fur, they’re low-shedding dogs. They tend to retain their coats more than most dogs. This phenomenon occurs as the Giant Schnoodle is a hybrid cross of two breeds. Both favored for their the limited amount of coat-shedding. It’s one of the more attractive features of the hybrid. They don’t shed much. That means they’re easier to clean after in the home. They still require weekly grooming to keep their beautiful coats in the best condition.

6. They have the DNA of hunters and workers

The Standard Poodle is a breed that goes back to the 1500s where they were used as hunting dogs in their home country of Germany. The Giant Schnauzer is also a German breed used to drive cattle and as guard dogs in the 1900s. This is a versatile hybrid that has hunting instincts, but they can also drive cattle or stand guard over the home. They’re working dogs who give as much to their families as they take. They can earn their keep in the family.

7. They shouldn’t eat carbs and grains

Giant Schnoodles are likely to inherit genetic digestive issues from their Poodle ancestors. It means that when your Giant Schnoodle hits middle age, he will be prone to pancreatitis and other digestive problems. If you watch his diet, you may be able to avoid these problems. Keep him off grains and other carbs. Feed him on a schedule to ensure he doesn’t overeat. Avoid high-fat meals and treats in favor of healthy proteins. Your Giant Schnoodle will be a lot healthier as he enters the middle edge through his golden years.

8. Giant Schnoodles come in all sizes

Pet Keen advises that the Giant Schnoodle averages a height at the shoulder between 22 to 28-inches. The average weight of these dogs at maturity can be anywhere from 55 to 110 pounds. Males are generally larger than females. They’re large dogs and some of them are huge, so make sure that you have plenty of space for him to move around and get his exercise.

9. They’re ideal for people with allergies

Giant Schnoodles are ideal for people looking for hypoallergenic dogs. The hair is ample and wavy but, it doesn’t fall out in large amounts. They don’t shed much because they inherit a hypoallergenic trait from each parent. While no animal with fur is one hundred percent hypoallergenic, these dogs come close.

10. They’re great for families

Giant Schnoodles make excellent family pets. They’re loyal, friendly, and protective. These dogs are easy to train because of their high intelligence. They’re intelligent dogs that learn quickly. When properly cared for, the average lifespan is between ten and fifteen years. The Giant Schnoodle is a dog that will grow and mature with the family and become a beloved member. When they receive positive reinforcement training with socialization socialized from puppyhood, they’re good with children, adults, and other family pets. They come in a fair range of colors and coat patterns ranging from black, tan, silver, and white. The Giant Schnoodle is a hybrid that is becoming more popular because of its many endearing personality traits. If you’re looking for a large dog that is happy to help you work or just to keep you company, they’re worthy of consideration.

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