The Questions You Need to Ask Before Getting a Teacup Chihuahua

Teacup Chihuahua

In the world of pets, smaller is often better in the eye of pet holders. While some people love a big dog that will make them feel safe and protected, little designer dogs that fit into a designer Louis Vuitton dog bag are considered en vogue at the moment. One such dog is the teacup Chihuahua. This dog is, essentially, a Chihuahua that is half the size of the regular Chihuahua. Considering the average full-grown Chihuahua is only 6 pounds, it’s hard to imagine having a 3-pound dog that’s full grown. But, some people want this dog desperately and are willing to pay exorbitant prices to get one.

Since most people think that a dog is a dog, and a breeder is a breeder, they don’t do quite enough research before the go out and spend hundreds, if not thousands, on a dog. They don’t ask the right questions, they don’t take into consideration the reputation of the breeder, and they buy from just anyone. The issue with this is that these dogs are very susceptible to health issues that aren’t going to bode well for anyone in the long run.

It was in the 90s that this breed became popular – and it’s important to note that “teacup” is not an official term. It’s something people began nicknaming these dogs. They’re just small Chihuahuas. When it became known that the smallness of this dog was popular, breeders began deliberately breeding their dogs to be as small as possible so that they could ask more money for them. While this might seem fine, it’s not. There are several health issues that plague these dogs the smaller that they are, and that means you have to ask some very serious and often uncomfortable questions when it comes to speaking with breeders. Get ready, because it’s not easy to find these dogs and while it might not be very easy for you to acknowledge, you might have to walk away from at least one breeder before you find the right teacup Chihuahua.

May I See the Vet History of Both Parents?

Whatever you do, do not skip this question. This is the most important question you will ask when it comes to buying a teacup. This question is going to determine whether or not you’re wasting your money on a new puppy. Do not let the cute size and faces of these little puppies fool you; they’re expensive, and you don’t want one that’s not going to live long.

These dogs have a myriad of health problems. You’ll need to see the vet paperwork on both parents to ensure that you’re not buying a dog that has twice the chance of being diagnosed with serious health issues. The breed and size is enough to increase this puppy’s chances of getting sick or suffering from health concerns; being bred by a dog or two dogs that have already suffered from many health issues only increases the chances that his particular puppy will suffer health problems. Ask to see this paperwork. Walk away if it is not provided, and walk away if the paperwork looks dismal.

It’s also important that you ask to see the vet records for the puppies. They’ll need to see the vet soon after birth, and that’s information you want to have. Any breeder not willing to share this information willingly is one you should walk away from as quickly as possible.

Is There Anything I Should Know About This Breed?

A good way to tell if a breeder is a good one is to ask a question that will provide that answer for you based on their answer. They’re not expecting you to already have this information available, so you can tell based on their answer whether or not they are a good and reputable breeder. By asking this particular question, you open yourself up to interpret a lot. The correct answer from a breeder would be one of several things. Overall, yes, you should know several things. One is that the teacup Chihuahua is a very small dog with a very small tolerance for pain and accidents. Used to sleeping with your dogs? Here’s something your breeder should tell you; if you sleep with this dog and roll over onto it, it’s likely that you will either fracture or break at least one of the dog’s bones. The same goes for accidentally sitting on it on the couch or allowing small children to carry it around and play with it. It’s a small dog, and therefore it’s not a strong dog. A good breeder will tell you this because their main concern is the health of the dog. A bad breeder will not tell you this for fear that you will not buy their dog, because their main concern is their income and their sale. They will also tell you that you will probably spend a great deal of time at the vet, so a good relationship with a good vet is important. Good breeders will provide all the information you need to know. Bad ones or questionable ones will gloss over anything that might directly affect their sales.

Can I Have a Teacup Chihuahua and Other Pets?

We can tell you this answer so you don’t need to ask, but you should still ask even knowing the answer. It will help you see if you are working with a reputable breeder. The short answer is no, you should not have other pets – cats or dogs – if you have a dog this size. Even the smallest animals are going to prove very large in comparison, which means that they might injure your dog. Since animals aren’t worried about size, they won’t stop playing. Your new puppy might want to play with the other dog or cat in the house and while they’re goofing off and wrestling, the puppy could end up hurt. It’s not because your other animals are aggressive or dangerous; it’s just that they’re animals and they’re playful. This could cause the smaller animal to end up hurt.

 Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images

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